Designing course assessment

1- Achievement of course outcomes and learning objectives:

Learning objectives and course outcomes are clearly explained and are addressed in content resources, explored in assignments, and measured through assessments.


A- Course outcomes are enumerated in the syllabus.
The syllabus clearly lists the expected course-level learning outcomes in a way that is fully consistent with the official course description form.

B- Responsibilities of students and instructors for achieving the course learning outcomes are clearly explained in the syllabus or course survival guide.

Explanations should include how and how well a student is expected to demonstrate mastery of learning outcomes. They should provide guidance about how to prepare to demonstrate mastery (study, practice, discussion, etc.). They should also include explanations of how the instructor will facilitate this learning (teaching method, kinds of formative feedback on assignments, etc.).

C- Course content, assignments, and assessments are in alignment with learning objectives.

The study and assignments that students are expected to do in order to master learning objectives clearly helps them do so.
The assessments ask the students to demonstrate mastery in the way students were prepared to demonstrate them through assignments and study.
Example of misalignment:

• Provide a lesson on walking, then assign work that helps students practice running, and finally assess students on their ability to jump.

Note:

1-
Course outcomes are translated into module/unit level learning objectives.
Course outcomes are parsed into specific learning objectives that can concretely be addressed in individual course modules, units, or lessons. These learning objectives are clearly stated in each module, unit, or lesson.

2-
All expected learning objectives and outcomes are assessable and are clearly explained in the learning modules/units.
The study and assignments that students are expected to do in order to master learning objectives clearly helps them do so.
The assessments ask the students to demonstrate mastery in the way students were prepared to demonstrate them through assignments and study.
Example of misalignment:

• Provide a lesson on walking, then assign work that helps students practice running, and finally assess students on their ability to jump.

3-
At every level of the course (course, module & activity) students are provided with learning objectives.
Not only does the whole course have course outcomes, and the units/modules/lessons have learning objectives, but individual assignments and activities have an explained connection to lesson learning objectives and course outcomes.

4- The relationship between all elements of content and the corresponding objective(s) is spelled out for the students, including how the objectives will be achieved and assessed.
Students are provided with sufficient explanatory material at the course, unit/module/lesson, and assignment/activity level, that in all cases they can understand why they are doing what they are doing, and what level of mastery they will be expected to achieve.

2- Assessment

Appropriate assessments of student learning are provided.

A- Evaluation instruments assess the stated learning outcomes.
Examples of inconsistency:


• Objective is to solve multiple-level problems, and true-false quiz is used.

• Objective is to write a persuasive argument, and multiple-choice quiz is used.

B- The instruments are appropriate for an online delivery system.
Appropriate examples:


• Submissions by email or drop box
• Exams in proctored settings
• Timed quizzes
• Online discussions/chats
• Group projects
• Research projects/papers


C- An adequate number of assessments are used.
Examples:

• A sufficient number of instruments are used to ensure that outcomes are adequately assessed, sufficient variety of instruments is used, and several levels of learning styles are addressed.

D- Each assessment comes with clear directions and grading criteria.

Note:

1- A variety of instruments are used.

Examples:

• Tests/quizzes
• Discussions/chats
• Homework assignments
• Writing assignments
• Group projects
• Research projects/papers

2- Instruments are designed to address a variety of cognitive levels and learning styles.

Examples:

• Instruments assess cognitive levels from the simple recall or recognition of facts through increasingly complex and abstract mental levels, to evaluation.

• Evaluations use a wide variety of words, pictures, self-reflection activities, cooperative learning, art activities, role play, multimedia, field trips, etc.

3- Instructors provide a timetable for when feedback will be given to students.

Examples:
• Instructors indicate if and when they will participate in discussions.
• Instructors indicate when grades will be available or sent.

4- Assessment instructions indicate that prescriptive, formative feedback is provided.

Examples:
• Answers to assignments are posted after due date has past.
• Instruments are used that have feedback built-in.

3- Academic quality

The course has comparable rigor, depth, breadth, content, currency, coverage, completeness as the same or similar courses taught traditionally and/or online.

A- Rigor
The level of challenge for students in mastering the course knowledge and skills is appropriate.

B- The content of the course has appropriate depth, breadth, coverage, and completeness.

• Content includes the range of topics appropriate for the course.
• The topics are developed with appropriate richness and detail.
• No major topics are wholly omitted from the course.

C- Currency
The topics of the course reflect current understanding, or explain current controversy.

D- Overall quality
The quality of the course content, viewed holistically, is comparable to that in face-to-face courses.



ORGANIZING AND USING TEST RESULTS


A checklist for successful testing :

A. Purposes of test

1. Clearly defined (theoretical and practical orientations).
2. Understood and agreed upon by staff

B. Test itself

C. Physical needs arranged

1. Adequate and quiet space
2. Enough time in that space for some flexibility
3. Clear scheduling

D. Pre-administration arrangements

1 .Students properly notified
2. Students signed up for test
3. Students given precise information (where "and when test will be, as well as what they should do to prepare and what they should bring with them, especially identification if required)

E. Administration

1. Adequate materials in hand (test booklets, answer sheets, cassette tapes, X pencils, scoring templates, and so forth) plus extras
2. All necessary equipment in hand and tested (cassette players, micro-phones, public address system, videotape players, blackboard, chalk, and so forth) with 'backups where appropriate
3. Proctors trained in their duties
4. All necessary information distributed to proctors (test directions, answers to obvious questions, schedule of who is to be where and when, and so forth)

F. Scoring

1. Adequate space for all scoring to take place
2. Clear scheduling of scoring and notification of results
3. Sufficient qualified staff for all scoring activities
4. Staff trained in all scoring procedures

G. Interpretation

1. Clearly defined uses for results
2. Provision for helping teachers interpret scores and explain them to students
3. A well-defined place for the results in the overall curriculum

H. Record keeping

1. All necessary resources for keeping track of scores
2. Ready access to the records for administrators and staff
3. Provision for eventual systematic termination of records

F. Ongoing research

1. Results used to full advantage for research
2. Results incorporated into overall program evaluation plan

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